From Science Daily:

Obesity has direct consequences on health and is associated with the onset of aggressive cancers, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are little known. Researchers from the Institut de Pharmacologie et he Biologie Structurale (CNRS/Université Toulouse III — Paul Sabatier) have recently elucidated one of these mechanisms in prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men: in obese patients, the adipose tissue surrounding the prostate gland facilitates the propagation of tumor cells outside the prostate. A patent has been filed for these results, which open new avenues for the treatment of prostate cancer, and are published in Nature Communications on January 12, 2016.

The prostate is surrounded by a fatty deposit called periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT). As prostate cancer progresses, tumor cells may infiltrate this periprostatic adipose tissue: this is a key step in the progression of this cancer, as it signals locally advanced disease (where the cancer can progress to nearby organs). This phenomenon is more frequent in obese patients, in whom the size and number of PPAT adipocyte cells are higher. These cells can secrete numerous bioactive molecules such as chemokines, which can attract other cells. The scientists investigated whether this change in PPAT was responsible for the aggressiveness of prostate cancer in obese subjects.

The researchers showed that adipocyte secretions can attract prostate tumor cells. By analyzing chemokines secreted by PPAT adipocytes they identified the factors involved, in particular chemokine CCL7, which interacts with one of its receptors, CCR3, present on the surface of prostate…

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