From Medical Xpress:

Model of memory formation in the central nervous system and the immune system Credit: Westermann et al./Trends in Neurosciences 2015

More than a century ago, scientists demonstrated that sleep supports the retention of memories of facts and events. Later studies have shown that slow-wave sleep, often referred to as deep sleep, is important for transforming fragile, recently formed memories into stable, long-term memories. Now, in an Opinion article published September 29 in Trends in Neurosciences, part of a special issue on Neuroimmunology, researchers propose that deep sleep may also strengthen immunological memories of previously encountered pathogens.

“While it has been known for a long time that sleep supports long-term formation in the psychological domain, the idea that long-term is a function of sleep effective in all organismic systems is in our view entirely new,” says senior author Jan Born of the University of Tuebingen. “We consider our approach toward a unifying concept of biological long-term memory formation, in which sleep plays a critical role, a new development in and memory research.”

The immune system “remembers” an encounter with a bacteria or virus by collecting fragments from the bug to create memory T , which last for months or years and help the body recognize a previous infection and quickly respond. These memory T cells appear to abstract “gist information” about the pathogens, as only T cells that store information about the tiniest fragments ever elicit a response. The selection of gist information allows…

Continue Reading