From Blacklistednews:

The annual intelligence authorization is under way, with the Senate deciding how much money the nation’s spy agencies will receive next year, along with anything else they can slip in while no one’s looking. The entire discussion takes place behind closed doors, so there’s very little stopping the Intelligence Committee’s many surveillance fans from amending the bill to increase intelligence agencies’ powers.

Fortunately, there’s still one person on the inside who continues to perform his oversight duties.

A provision snuck into the still-secret text of the Senate’s annual intelligence authorization would give the FBI the ability to demand individuals’ email data and possibly web-surfing history from their service providers without a warrant and in complete secrecy.

If passed, the change would expand the reach of the FBI’s already highly controversial national security letters.

[…]

The spy bill passed the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, with the provision in it. The lone no vote came from Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who wrote in a statement that one of the bill’s provisions “would allow any FBI field office to demand email records without a court order, a major expansion of federal surveillance powers.”

Wyden did not disclose exactly what the provision would allow, but his spokesperson suggested it might go beyond email records to things like web-surfing histories and other information about online behavior. “Senator Wyden is concerned it could be read that way,” Keith Chu said.

The FBI’s history of abusing NSLs is well-documented. These letters allow the agency to route…

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