From Medical Xpress:

In this Nov. 26, 2014 file photo, the brain-scanning MRI machine that was used at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, for an experiment on tracking brain data is seen on campus. Men and women can look pretty different, but a new study says their brains can’t be neatly divided into male and female. Specific parts of the brain show anatomical differences, but they only rarely line up to point to one sex or the other in a given person’s brain, the researchers said. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

Are the brains of men and women truly different? Not if you look at the overall structure, a new study says.

While specific parts show , an individual brain only rarely has all “male” traits or all “female” traits, researchers report.

It’s more likely to be a mixed bag: some things are more common in women, some more common in men, and some are common in both.

That argues against the idea that brains can be neatly divided into two sex-based categories, Daphna Joel of Tel-Aviv University and co-authors conclude.

They published their work in a paper released Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

They used MRI scans of more than 1,400 brains, focusing on anatomy rather than how brains work. They scored variable traits like tissue thickness or volume in different parts of the brain. They focused on traits that showed the biggest sex differences, dividing the scores into a predominantly male zone, a predominantly…

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