From Dr. Mercola:

At one point in time, sugar was a delicacy, a condiment that was difficult to come by. If you were lucky, you may have added it to your coffee or tea.

But according to Dr. Robert Lustig, professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco (USCF), sugar was “still extraordinarily expensive until the middle of the 18th to 19th century.”

That expense may have been a blessing in disguise, as it made it virtually impossible for mot people to consume in excess. And therein lies the problem. Sugar acts as a chronic, dose-dependent liver toxin (poison) when consumed in excess, Dr. Lustig has stated.

In fact, the rise of chronic metabolic disease in the U.S. follows the growth of the U.S. sugar industry and increases in per capita sugar consumption.

Today, we consume about 20 times more sugar than our ancestors did, and we have very little control over the amount since what was once a condiment has now become a dietary staple.

Why Is Sugar Bad for Your Liver?

The main problem with sugar, and processed fructose in particular, is the fact that your liver has a very limited capacity to metabolize it. In the video above, Dr. Lustig explains why sugar is so damaging for your liver and how it may lead to diabetes.

Part of the problem, according to Dr. Lustig, is that you can safely metabolize only about six teaspoons of added sugar per day.

However, the average American consumes 20 teaspoons of added sugar a day.1 All that excess sugar is metabolized into body fat, and leads to many chronic metabolic diseases, including but not limited to:

Type 2 diabetes Cardiovascular disease Hypertension (high blood pressure) Dementia Cancer

According to SugarScience.org, a product of Dr. Robert Lustig and colleagues, who have reviewed more than 8,000 independent studies on sugar and its role in heart disease, type 2 diabetes, liver disease and more:2,3

“Over time, consuming large quantities of added sugar can stress and damage critical organs, including the pancreas and liver. When the pancreas, which produces insulin to process sugars, becomes overworked, it can fail to regulate blood sugar properly.

Large doses of the sugar fructose also can overwhelm the liver, which metabolizes fructose. In the process, the liver will convert excess fructose to fat, which is stored in the liver and also released into the bloodstream.

This process contributes to key elements of MetS [metabolic syndrome], including high blood fats or triglycerides, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and extra body fat in the form of a sugar belly.”

Borderline High Blood Sugar Levels Linked to Kidney Damage

Your body is designed to have just one teaspoon of sugar in your blood at all times — if that. If your blood sugar level were to rise to one tablespoon of sugar you would run the risk of going into a hyperglycemic coma and even dying.

Your body works very hard to prevent this from happening by producing

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