From PhysOrg:

In this Sept. 24, 2015 file photo, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, confers with committee Vice Chair. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. on Capitol Hill in Washington. A proposed law meant to encourage companies to share information about cyber threats with the U.S. government includes measures that could significantly limit what details, if any, the public can review about the program through federal and state public records laws. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

A proposed law meant to encourage companies to share information about cyberthreats with the U.S. government includes measures that could significantly limit what details, if any, the public can review about the program through federal and state public records laws.

The legislation—already passed in both houses of Congress but not yet finalized—would keep secret any a hands over to the Obama administration under a new cybersecurity agreement, including specifics the firms decide themselves shouldn’t be disclosed. It’s not clear whether that secrecy would extend to learning whether particular companies are even participating.

The cyberagreement passed with bipartisan support, despite privacy concerns over Senate language from some lawmakers and technology companies, including Apple Inc. and Dropbox Inc. It’s the culmination of a roughly six-year effort made possible by recent additions of antitrust and consumer-liability protections for the companies’ participation.

Transparency advocates said the new law would provide excessive cover to tech companies through new restrictions to the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, which also supersedes state and tribal open-records laws. That…

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