From Science Daily:

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who’d recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. The study also sheds light on the brain’s mechanisms for repairing or compensating for concussion injuries–information that could speed the development of therapies. The study was published online in the American Journal of Neuroradiology.

“Our study presents for the first time a precision approach to harness imaging at the time of concussion to forecast outcome a year later,” said study leader Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., professor of radiology, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and of neuroscience, as well as associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center (MRRC) at Einstein and director of MRI services at Montefiore. “While we still lack effective treatments, we now have a better understanding of the neurological mechanisms that underlie a favorable response to concussion, which opens a new window on how to look at therapies and to measure their effectiveness.”

Each year, 2.5 million people in the United States sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBI), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Concussions account for at least 75 percent of these injuries. Diagnosing concussion is based on assessing symptoms; there is no objective biomarker or test. Symptoms can vary widely–lasting for just seconds or sometimes not appearing for days or weeks after injury. Common symptoms including seizures, trouble sleeping, decreased coordination, repeated vomiting or nausea, confusion, and slurred speech.

“While…

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